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Applied Biology: Journals + Databases

Subject guide for Biology

Biology Databases

Cool Website

TREE OF LIFE

With the publication of 'On the Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection' on the 24th November 1859, Charles Darwin not only explained how and why we have the diversity of life we see all around us, but also showed how all life is connected.

Since then we have continued to gather evidence from a range of different disciplines including physiology, biochemistry and DNA analysis. The evidence indicates that all organisms on Earth are genetically related, a genealogical relationship that can be represented as an evolutionary tree known as the Tree of Life.

Tree of Life

Backward + Forward Citation Searching

Citation searching, sometimes called cited reference searching, refers to finding articles that have cited a previously published older work (i.e. following research forward). Citation searching can also include looking at the citations within a paper (i.e. the Reference List) to trace research backwards.

The number of times a paper is cited in the work of others can be an indication of its usefulness. Through citation searching, you can discover how a known idea or innovation has been confirmed, applied, improved, extended, or corrected. Citation analysis can also be used to identify emerging areas of research, identify a field's leading researchers and to assess research output.

CREATION MOVES FORWARD IN SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATION

RESEARCH MOVES BACKWARD

The Kettering database Web of Science has a 'Citation Network' box next to each article. This gives a snapshot of how many times the article was cited (forward citation searching) and how many cited references the article contains (backward citation searching.) 

The Citation Map below shows a visualization of both backward and forward citation searching. Note that only articles included inside Web of Science are counted.

Finding Articles Using Google Scholar

LINKING KETTERING + GOOGLE SCHOLAR

Did you know you can use Google Scholar to search Kettering databases for articles and journals? It should automatically work if you are logged into Google with your Kettering email address. 

If it's not working, after logging in, just go to Settings Library Links from the Google Scholar homepage and type in Kettering University. Tick the check box and click Save. If we have an article, you'll see the 'Full-Text @ Kettering' link in your Google Scholar search results.

google scholar icon

Full-Text @ Kettering

Google Scholar also has an extension for the Chrome Browser worth checking out.

  

Request An Article

If you can't find an article inside Kettering's databases, you can request one through our InterLibrary Loan service. 

This service is free for students and faculty with a turn around time of one to seven days, depending on availability of the material.

 Article Request Form

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