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PHYS 342: Materials Science: Superconductors

Connects students in PHYS 342 with information on Materials Science and resources in the library.

Meissner Effect

Magnetic Levitation

Niobium-Tin

Niobium-Tin


Structure


Properties

Melting point  
Boiling point    
Density near r.t.    
when liquid, at m.p.  
Heat of fusion  
Heat of vaporization  
Molar heat capacity  
   

 


Applications

Nb3Sn is extremely brittle and thus can not be easily drawn into a wire, which is necessary for windingsuperconducting magnets. To overcome this, wire manufacturers typically draw down composite wires containing ductile precursors. The "internal tin" process includes separate alloys of Nb, Cu and Sn. The "bronze" process contains Nb in a copper-tin bronze matrix. With both processes the strand is typically drawn to final size and coiled into a solenoid or cable before heat treatment. It is only during the heat treatment that the Sn reacts with the Nb to form the brittle, superconducting niobium-tin compound. The powder-in-tube process is also used. The high field section of modern NMR magnets are composed of niobium-tin wire. Some niobium-tin wires can be wound after heat treatment.

Lanthanum-Barium-Copper Oxide

Structure

 


Properties

Critical Temperature    30K


Applications

The first high temperature superconductor

Yttrium-Barium-Copper Oxide

Yttrium-barium-copper oxide


Structure

  


Properties

Chemical formula YBa2Cu3O7
Molar mass 666.19 g/mol
Appearance Black solid
Density 6.3 g/cm3
Melting point >1000 °C
Solubility in water Insoluble

Applications

Magentic resonance imaging, magnetic levitation, Josephson junctions

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